12 less-known people with exceptional Superhuman capabilities

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They have powers and abilities far beyond those of mortal men or women. But unlike the characters of the comic book, these extraordinary people were quite real. Here are 12 less-known people with exceptional Superhuman capabilities.

1. There was a woman named Veronica Seider who had vision 20x better than average. She could identify people more than a mile (1.6 km) away. A normal human can barely see detail from 20 feet away.

woman looking through magnifier glass
Image just for representation, hence not the original person. image source

Veronica Seider, a German dentist, holds the Guinness world record for “Smallest Visible Object”.

In October 1972 the University of Stuttgart, then West Germany, reported that their student Veronica Seider (b. 1951) possessed a visual acuity 20 times better than average. She could identify people at a distance of more than a mile (1.6 km).

She apparently had telescopic vision. Seider also claimed that she could see the individual red, green and blue dots that make up the picture on a color television set.(1,2)

2. After hitting his head in the shallow end of a swimming pool, a man awoke with the condition known as “acquired musical savant syndrome.” He had become a great pianist without ever learning to play. 

derek amato
image source

Derek Amato is just one of few people in the entire world suffering from Acquired Savant Syndrome, where people display profound abilities after suffering head trauma.

After years of failed jobs and homelessness, he is now enjoying a career in music and can play eight instruments – despite never having a lesson in his life.

While research into the cause is ongoing, there is no single theory explaining all savants. Many researchers believe the underlying cause of savant syndrome occurs when the right brain compensates for an injury on the left brain.

It is extremely rare for a savant to lose their skills after they have acquired them.(source)

3. Roy Cleveland Sullivan, a Forest Ranger who had an incredible attraction to lightning or rather it had an attraction to him. Sullivan was struck by lightning seven times at different occasions during his lifetime and survived each jolt, but not unscathed.

roy cleveland sullivan
image source

Roy Cleveland Sullivan was a Forest Ranger in Virginia who had an incredible attraction to lightning or rather it had an attraction to him. Over his 36-year career as a ranger, Sullivan was struck by lightning seven times – and survived each jolt, but not unscathed.

In case you’re wondering, the odds of getting struck by lightning are about one in 280,000,000. The odds of getting struck by lightning seven times are 4.15 in 100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.

Lightning may not have been able to kill Roy Sullivan, but perhaps the threat of it did. It was a bullet, not a bolt. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in 1983.(1,2)

4. A man named Dean Karnazes has a physiological advantage in that he doesn’t seem to have a lactate threshold; thus was able to run 350 miles (560 kms) in under 80 hours and 44 minutes without sleep.

dean karnazes
Photograph: PatitucciPhoto image source

From club runners to Olympians, every athlete has a limit. Scientifically, this limit is defined as the body’s lactate threshold and when you exercise beyond it, running rapidly becomes unpleasant.

We’ve all experienced that burning feeling – heart pounding, lungs gasping for air – as your muscles begin to fatigue, eventually locking up altogether as your body shuts down.

However, Dean Karnazes is an ultrarunner from California and, at times, it seems as if he can run for ever.

Karnazes has completed a number of endurance events, mostly running events. Most notable achievements include:

  • Ran 350 miles (560 km) in 80 hours and 44 minutes without sleep.
  • “The Relay”, a 199-mile (320 km) run, eleven times.
  • Ran a marathon to the South Pole in -13 °F (-25 °C) without snowshoes.
  • Ran a marathon in each of the 50 states in 50 consecutive days.
  • 148 miles (238 km) in 24 hours on a treadmill.
  • Eleven-time 100-Mile/1 Day.
  • Ran 3,000 miles (4,800 km) across the United States in 75 days, running 40 to 50 miles (65 to 80 km) per day.
  • and many more.(1,2)
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